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Presentations

Download Welcome Presentation

Who, What, Where, Why, and How Opening Keynote

Abstract
There are many interesting changes happening in and around LibraryLand. From the Digital Public Library of America and Linked Open Data, to the Open Access movement's strengthening momentum, to the growing demand for research data services. This session will break down some of the biggest developments emerging today and explore why these large scale initiatives should influence what we do locally, everyday.

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Presented By:

  • Rachel Frick, Director, Digital Library Federation Program, Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR)

Embracing Change: As Librarians Adapt Users Win Closing Keynote

Abstract
The internet, Google, e-journals, packages, eBooks and patron driven acquisitions have all been perceived as "a threat to libraries as we know them". Yet, in spite of these developments and under the weight of chronic budget pressures, the typical academic library now offers more users better access to more content and services than ever before. In this session we will look at how librarians and the vendors that serve them have responded to these "threats" to their future to create new and improved services.

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Presented By:

  • Oliver Pesch, Chief Strategist at EBSCO

The 2012 UNC System-Wide E-Journal Survey: A Discussion of Processes, Data, and Outcomes

Abstract
In February of 2012, the University of North Carolina (UNC) General Administration developed an initiative to identify cross-system efficiencies and pursue cost savings. One component of this initiative concerned the UNC libraries’ collections of e-journals. To facilitate an analysis of return-on-investment for these collections, UNC libraries participated in a survey to gather, collate, and analyze data regarding e-journal expenditures, use, and cost-per-use. This presentation will discuss the survey, its results, and its impacts. After first describing the process through which the survey was carried out, the presenters will summarize and analyze the results of the data collection. In doing so, they will review and critique the recommendations issued in a report by the third-party accounting firm that coordinated the survey. Finally, the presenters will summarize the activities of the working group that was formed to implement the report’s recommendations. Throughout the presentation, the presenters will emphasize the opportunities and challenges of collaborating to make cross-institutional assessments of e-journal return-on-investment.

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Presented By:

  • Patrick Carr, Head of Electronic and Continuing Resources Acquisitions at Joyner Library, East Carolina University
  • Robert Wolf, Serials/Digital Operations Coordinator at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke

"Can We Lend?": Communicating Interlibrary Loan Rights

Abstract
We will provide background on our project to communicate interlibrary loan rights to the interlibrary loan staff at three locations at West Virginia University. The Electronic Journals Coordinator analyzes periodical licenses for interlibrary loan rights. She then enters these rights in a standardized form in Serials Solutions' electronic resource management system. The information is displayed on the electronic journals web page where the interlibrary loan staff can use it to make a decision regarding lending. The Electronic Journals Coordinator will present an overview of the various types of licenses, the variance in expression of interlibrary loan rights in publishers' licenses, and how this information is communicated for interlibrary loan purposes. The Interlibrary Loan Librarian will discuss the importance of the rights being readily available to the interlibrary loan staffs and how it is used in ILLiad and RapidILL. We will also outline the communication channels used to notify the Electronic Journals Coordinator that interlibrary loan rights are needed.

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Presented By:

  • Linda Blake, Electronic Journals Coordinator and Science Librarian at West Virginia University
  • Hilary Fredette, Head of Access Services, Interlibrary Loan, and Multimedia Services at West Virginia University

Communities of Knowledge: Creating and Connecting Resource Metadata

Abstract
A growing number of groups and organizations across the library industry have, or are developing, their own knowledge bases of e-resource metadata. Some of these efforts are community-sourced, while others have corporate backing. The structure, format, and scope of these knowledge bases vary. MARC, FRBR, RDA, Linked Data, BIBFRAME, and relational models are all represented in the technical mix. What is driving this development? Who shares in the benefits of these new offerings? How might e-resource management and discovery change as a result? Where does the expertise of serials librarians play a part? A review of the current state of affairs will consider the problems these new communities of knowledge are attempting to solve, compare their approaches, and outline some of the challenges to their success. The recent experiences of the team of librarians and developers building the Serials Solutions Knowledgebase will be used as one example of a project underway.

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Presented By:

  • Yvette Diven, Senior Product Manager at Serials Solutions

Impact of Journal Cancellations on Interlibrary Loan Demand

Abstract
Following a large-scale journal cancellation project in 2011, Hunter Library was concerned about what effect cuts to the serials collection might have on Interlibrary Loan request volume. Expectations were that demand for the cancelled titles via ILL would increase. Collections staff are half-way through a two-year monitoring project to track ILL article borrowing requests for the cancelled journal titles. The presentation will describe:

  • factors that mitigating increased ILL demand, including the original reasons for cancellation of the title and the nature of demand for each title,
  • ILL demand for the cancelled titles over the first year after cancellation,
  • implications of these results for future journal cancellation projects.

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Presented By:

  • Rachel Fleming, Serials Librarian at Western Carolina University
  • Kristin Calvert, Electronic Resources Librarian at Western Carolina University

Panel Discussion - Serials from the Other Side: An Editorial Perspective on Current Trends in Scholarly Communication

Download Wald's Presentation

Download Goldfield's Presentation

Panel:

  • Priscilla Wald, Professor of English and Women's Studies at Duke University, and editor of American Literature (published by Duke University Press)
  • Elaine Cohen Hubal, Senior Scientist in U.S. EPA's National Center for Computational Toxicology, former head of the publications board and current editorial board member for Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology (published by Nature)
  • David Goldfield, Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History at UNC Charlotte, and editor of Journal of Urban History (published by Sage)
  • Moderator: Patricia (Tricia) Hudson, Oxford University Press

Providing Alumni Access to Electronic Resources

Abstract
They asked – we're providing. Alumni have wanted to retain their access to library electronic resources; some of our vendors have begun to make this possible. We'll explore which vendors, issues in getting started, and usage data. Presented by Nancy Gibbs and Dianne Ford

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Presented By:

  • Nancy Gibbs, Head of Acquisitions, Duke University
  • Dianne Ford, Coordinator of Serials/Government Documents, Elon University

Resource Description and Access: It's Really Not So Bad

Abstract
In this session, we will discuss background on RDA’s philosophy - how and why it came to be; the basic mechanics of RDA with regard to continuing resources cataloging and authority control; impacts of RDA on staff and their workflows; and possible and probable changes to the OPAC.

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Presented By:

  • Kurt Blythe, Serials Access Librarian at Davis Library, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Wanda K. Gunther, Authority Control and Database Management Librarian at Davis Library, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Kristina Spurgin, E-Resources Cataloger at Davis Library, UNC-Chapel Hill

The Structure of Scholarly Communications within Academic Libraries

Abstract
Academic libraries often define their administrative structure according to services they offer, including research services, acquisitions, cataloging and metadata, and so on. Scholarly Communications is something of a moving target, though. How are Scholarly Communications positions defined, what duties do they often include, and how do they fit within the library’s administrative structure? Some of the first positions devoted to Scholarly Communications required JD’s and focused on Author’s Rights, copyright and fair use. Yet other positions recently advertised group Scholarly Communications librarians within Digital Scholarship units, which not only create and maintain institutional repositories, they also publish electronic journals and offer services related to data curation. This presentation will quickly review the findings recently published in a SPEC Kit, findings which focus on ARL Libraries. The main portion of the presentation, though, will move beyond the SPEC Kit by concentrating on non-ARL Libraries, reviewing their relevant position descriptions and library organization charts, among other resources, to uncover common duties for Scholarly Communications librarian positions and the variety of administrative structures in which they work.

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Also available at The Scholarship, East Carolina University's institutional repository

Presented By:

  • Joseph Thomas, Head of Collection Development for Joyner Library, East Carolina University